Is Steampunk Fantasy

Table of Contents

Is Steampunk Fantasy

The term Steampunk is a broad and often nebulous term. It can refer to any of a number of different things, from a specific retro-futuristic aesthetic to an entire fictional genre.
Are you familiar with the word ‘Fantasy’? Have you ever heard the words ‘Science Fiction’ before? If so, then chances are that you are at least somewhat familiar with these terms. So it stands to reason that if you know what Fantasy is, why wouldn’t you also know what Science Fiction is? If your answer is that some people have difficulty telling fantasy from science fiction because both literary genres include speculative or fantastic elements then you have hit on one of the reasons why this term has proven so difficult to pin down. Essentially, there exists no universally agreed-upon definition of either Steampunk or Fantasy; they are two distinct genres that overlap each other in ways both subtle and obvious.
So what are we talking about when we discuss Steampunk? Do we mean an aesthetic where certain elements of technology resemble those seen in the Industrial Revolution but with other features ironed out to present us with more elegant design? Or do we mean a subgenre of Science Fiction where technologies are just as advanced as they are today but either originate in alternate worlds or alternate time periods? Does it make sense to think of them as one thing when clearly they represent very different things?

What is Steampunk?

The answer is that it is difficult to pin down what Steampunk actually is. The term’s origins are in fact very uncertain. Some people say that it was coined by K W Jeter in 1980, while others believe that the word has a much deeper history and can be traced back to the 19th century. Even if Steampunk does have a firm history, it is still difficult to define because the term covers so many different things.
If we are going to talk about Fantasy, then what is it? How do we define this genre when there are such a multitude of subgenres out there?
One way to think about this question is to pay close attention to what elements fantasy includes and exclude. Fantasy can contain all sorts of fantastic elements: magic, fantastical creatures or beings, strange or exotic settings, or time travel for example. It can also include certain literary devices such as irony and satire which help us understand these fantastical elements in our world with more clarity. With these parameters in mind, it becomes clear that fantasy often involves an element of the unreal in order to make sense of something that would otherwise be too strange or implausible for us to comprehend.
This idea of the unreal explains why fantasy literature often explores the juxtaposition between the mundane and fantastical worlds; this tension helps us better understand how ordinary life relates to otherworldly phenomena. Another helpful way of thinking about fantasy is by considering its most important themes: power structures, gender roles, racism

Steampunk defined

If you’re ready to explore all of these questions, then let’s take a closer look at what Steampunk is all about.
First off, there are two important things to keep in mind when it comes to Steampunk: the first is that it should not be confused with Science Fiction and the second is that we have no universally agreed upon definition for this subgenre of science fiction. So long as those two points are kept in mind, it can be understood that there are many different ways for the genre to manifest itself.
For example, let’s think about if you were to call Jane Austen a “Steampunk author” because she wrote a novel set in 18th century England where technology was used in a slightly different way than it was today. This would be an accurate statement because Jane Austen was writing after the industrial revolution, though her novel wouldn’t fall under the category of Steampunk by any means.
We could also consider Jules Verne’s work as being part of Steampunk because he wrote stories where characters traveled through time and into other worlds using steam-powered machines. Again, this would be an accurate statement because we know that Verne wrote after the Industrial Revolution but his work probably wouldn’t be considered Steampunk by anyone who really understands what the term means.
To make things even more complicated, we can also consider works such as A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess or Mad Max

Steampunk vs. Fantasy

The easiest way to differentiate between these two is to think of them in terms of the time period they exist in. Steampunk is speculative fiction that takes place primarily in the Victorian era, while Fantasy occurs in a time where technology has advanced beyond what we know today but hasn’t yet reached our current level. After all, there are many technologies that have been invented and then abandoned, such as airships, flying machines and even space travel.
Another possible way to look at this would be to see them as genres that take place primarily within an alternate reality or timeline. If you were to put it on a spectrum with Steampunk being more science-based and Fantasy being more fantastical then this could work fairly well. One key difference between the two is the presence of magic in Steampunk and its absence from Fantasy. For example, while Magic is not entirely absent from Science Fiction it is much less common than it would be if it existed within fantasy settings.

What is Fantasy?

Fantasy is a broad and often nebulous term. It can refer to any of a number of different things, from a specific retro-futuristic aesthetic to an entire fictional genre.
The term fantasy was coined in the early 1940s by J. R. R. Tolkien in The Hobbit, where he described himself as ‘a philologist, not a scholar of Fairy Tales’. Because it has been used to describe so many things, it is often difficult for people to tell what constitutes Fantasy and what does not. Essentially, there exists no universally agreed upon definition of either Steampunk or Fantasy; they are two distinct genres that overlap each other in ways both subtle and obvious.
What are we talking about when we discuss Steampunk? Do we mean an aesthetic where certain elements of technology resemble those seen in the Industrial Revolution but with other features ironed out to present us with more elegant design? Or do we mean a subgenre of Science Fiction where technologies are just as advanced as they are today but either originate in alternate worlds or alternate time periods? Does it make sense to think of them as one thing when clearly they represent very different things?

Here’s Why You Can’t Define Fantasy Correctly

Fantasy is an umbrella term for the broad spectrum of literature that includes all genres, settings, and themes. It is a genre that encompasses a wide range of speculative fiction. These elements include magic, fantastical creatures, or supernatural abilities in a world not governed by scientific laws.
This broad definition makes it difficult to define fantasy correctly because there are so many definitions in play with this term–all of which are correct in different contexts. Many people use the word ‘fantasy’ to describe Science Fiction because Science Fiction has fantasy elements to them. However, if we focus on the word ‘speculative’ then Fantasy becomes more relevant when applied to any speculative narrative.
In other words, Fantasy can be used interchangeably with any story that includes speculative elements like time-traveling, parallel dimensions, or cloning whether science fiction or not.

Defining Steampunk: The Etymology of the Word “Steampunk”

The word ‘steampunk’ likely comes from the 1877 novel The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson, in which a man dons a mask of leather and brass to disguise himself as an evil, murderous creature called Mr. Hyde. This is a literary device that later became seen as a metaphor for technology turning into something threatening, often found in Science Fiction novels of the 1920s and 30s.
So, when does Steampunk become Fantasy? This is where it gets tricky. The etymology of the word ‘steampunk’ provides some clues but not enough to provide definitive answers to this question. It may be tempting to think that Steampunk becomes Fantasy if it’s set in a fantastical world or time period but this is not always the case. There are many examples of Steampunk set in our own world with no fantastical elements at all (e.g., Seth Grahame-Smith’s Pride and Prejudice and Zombies).
So what are we really talking about when we discuss Steampunk? It may be more helpful to think of it as an aesthetic that borrows from Victorian fashion mixed with Technology; one that emphasizes both imagination from the past and technological innovation from today.

Steampunk can refer to any kind of science fantasy with Victorian styling which includes steam powered machinery or alternative history settings or anything else with steampunks within them

Summary

Steampunk is a broad and often nebulous term that can refer to any of a number of things, from an aesthetic to an entire fictional genre.
Steampunk is difficult to pin down because it can refer to so many different things and the line between Fantasy and Science Fiction is blurred.

FAQ’s

What is the difference between Fantasy and Science Fiction?

Fantasy is a genre of fiction that involves the impossible, the mystical or the supernatural, while science fiction is a genre of fiction that explores alternative futures or plausible possibilities. Fantasy and science fiction are similar because both deal with concepts such as magic and mythical creatures. However, fantasy and science fiction both use different themes, plots, and settings to appeal to a variety of audiences.
Fantasy stories often involve wondrous beings, characters who have special powers, and perilous adventures in exotic places. Because it involves magic and the supernatural, fantasy can be particularly popular with children. Science fiction stories, by contrast, often involve technology from our present day or the near future. Although they may include some fantastical elements such as robots or teleportation, most of the science fiction stories are grounded in reality.

There are many different types of fantasy and science fiction published today. Fantasy novels focus on magical quests or battles between good and evil; these are usually set in a medieval setting or another time period that is based in history but with the addition of mythical creatures and miracles. Science fiction novels often focus on humanity’s journey into space to reach new frontiers; these are usually set in our present day with a mixture of human and alien races. There is also fantasy vs sf romance novels where two characters overcome internal obstacles to be together in a loving relationship whereas romance novels can take place in any setting at any time period but still follow the given tropes of romance novels including passion intensify over time leading to happily ever after

What is the definition of Fantasy?

Fantasy is a literature, film, or video game genre that involves, among other things, fantastic or magical elements. The genre blends fantastic themes and fictional universes with classic, traditional, fairy-tale plot elements.

In Fantasy, characters often possess abilities and powers that are beyond the ordinary human condition. Additionally, Fantasy often contains elements of horror and the macabre.

Science Fiction is a type of speculative fiction that has to do with the possible future development of the real world. Science Fiction deals with scientific and technological development and its impact on society.

By now you should be pretty familiar with the meaning of fantasy and science fiction. Don’t be afraid to share your understanding of each of these terms with your friends on social media—after all, they’re probably more familiar with these definitions than you are!

What is the definition of Science Fiction?

Scientists have discovered that the colour green has certain healing properties that allow it to treat, among other things, chronic pain and migraine headaches. The University of Sussex, UK has found that green makes you healthier and lighter. It can increase your body temperature and lead to endorphin release. Green is an energy colour and has rejuvenating powers. It is associated with youth, transformation and spring. The researchers claim that a change in the colour of wallpapers or furniture can be an effective health intervention.

Scientists have discovered that the colour green has certain healing properties that allow it to treat, among other things, chronic pain and migraine headaches. The University of Sussex, UK has found that green makes you healthier and lighter. It can increase your body temperature and lead to endorphin release. Green is an energy colour and has rejuvenating powers. It is associated with youth, transformation and spring. The researchers claim that a change in the colour of wallpapers or furniture can be an effective health intervention.

Beautiful Steampunk Art

Shop Unique Steampunk Items

Click the items to zoom in

Steampunk Frederick
Steampunk Frederick

Hi

I am Frederick, but you may call me Freddy – that’s what my friends call me.

I love steampunk as a style and for my cloths and accessories, so I thought why not share my passion with you guys,

because I know there are a lot of us Steampunk lovers out there.
Enjoy!
Freddy

You May Love These Also:

How To Steampunk Anything
How To Steampunk Anything

Steampunk is a fantastic and ever-growing subculture. Whether you’re a fashionista, tech enthusiast, or a collector, there’s something for everyone when it comes to this

Read More »